The Julio César Chávez Jr. Case Files

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An overview-through links and excerpts-of Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. culled from the files of TCS. Relive the last two years of his career as Chavez heads into a real superfight against Sergio Martinez tonight.

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Delivering The Goods: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. W12 John Duddy

Duddy came out bombing early in the sixth, whipping lefts and rights without pause, before settling down to bait Chavez Jr. with foot feints. Chavez Jr., Culiacan, Mexico, soon began picking shots off with his gloves and countering with hard lefts, including a few decoys to the head to camouflage hooks to the body. A right uppercut jolted Duddy about a minute into the round, but, moments later, when Chavez Jr. charged in with his left lowered, Duddy crashed home an overhand right that staggered Chavez Jr. and left him on shaky legs. Duddy followed up with a flurry, but he is no longer the electric finisher of years ago, and Chavez Jr. weathered the assault. In fact, Chavez Jr., derided by some press jesters as a “fake” fighter, waved Duddy in with bravado and opted to continue trading big shots. From Delivering the Goods: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. W12 John Duddy.

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Sound & Fury: Pacquiao-Mayweather, Sanchez II, Liars, Duddy, Chavez Jr. & More

Now that Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. earned a nice win over John Duddy in an exciting fight, there is the possibility of him being overrated by the same bozos who underrated him in the first place. Right now, Chavez Jr. is not top 10 material, but if he dedicates himself to learning and working hard, Chavez Jr. might make some noise and post a surprising win or two. Freddie Roach will have to work hard on weaknesses that are guaranteed to get Chavez Jr. in trouble at a higher level. Among his flaws are a tendency to lean in on the inside, keeping his feet parallel in close, forgetting to use his jab, and a susceptibility to right hands. Chavez Jr. also tends to coast occasionally, and a fighter with more skill than Duddy is sure to take advantage of that. Criticism of Chavez Jr. was farfetched in the first place. These critics are hypnotized by the HBO imprimatur and anything that falls out of that purview is not “boxing” to them. Had Chavez Jr. beaten a slew of Pro Bowlers Tour participants on HBO, like Andre Berto or Cris Arreola have, then, of course, an exclamation point would follow his name in print for the rest of his life.

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Sound & Fury: Chavez Jr-Zbik, Donaire & P-4-P Lists, Mike Jones, & RingTV Exceeds Low Expectations

Chavez Jr., lazy outside of the ring, is much-maligned by the press, but perspective about him has often been lacking. Unlike some of the real phonies in boxing, his career has not been underwritten—inexplicably—by a premium cable network for no discernible reason. Whatever he has managed to earn in his career has been strictly on a supply and demand basis. And, except for his woeful performance against Troy Rowland in 2009, Chavez Jr. is almost always entertaining. In addition, he is not skilled enough—or dedicated enough, perhaps—to blow out many fighters, which also brings up the fact that his bout with Zbik is an even matchup, and there is a good chance that Chavez Jr. will lose.

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Mystery Street: Sebastian Zbik-Julio Cesar Chavez Jr Preview

With a gaudy record, a famous last name, and a work ethic comparable to that of Oblomov, Chavez has been maligned for years by the fickle American media corps. But Chavez, who makes his debut on HBO after more than 40 outings, is the rare fighter who can make a living without being subsidized by a premium cable network. And he has done so the old-fashioned way: by getting people to buy tickets and order pay-per-views. If HBO suddenly unplugged its support from Andre Berto and Chad Dawson it would be like cutting the tether of astronauts during a spacewalk: they would float away along with interstellar debris and drifting asteroids, never to be seen or heard from again. In the hypothetical case of the astronauts, this would be a tragedy; as far as the HBO headliners go, maybe not such a bad thing. From Mystery Street: Sebastian Zbik-Julio Cesar Chavez Jr Preview

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Ordinary Heroes: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr W12 Sebastian Zbik

Now 42-0-1-1 (30), Chavez stands poised to be the next hobbyhorse for clueless media hacks who think that only Cy Young Award winners ought to be allowed to throw a baseball, even if they’re hurling cut sliders at Special Olympics players in a dimly lit alley, and even if the Cy Young Award winners are products of the collective cyber-imagination. No, Chavez is not the second coming of Carlos Zarate. And Zbik is never going to make anyone think of Max Schmeling. But they both fought with pride, determination, and ambition from bell to bell, despite their reputations as ordinary pugs. We should all be so lucky to see ordinary pugs go at it like that more often. From Ordinary Heroes: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr W12 Sebastian Zbik

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Problem Child: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.-Peter Manfredo Jr. Preview

After two years of chaos—marked by a lack of discipline, a suspension, several cancelled fights, and a spell of hypochondria—Chavez rebounded to squeak by Sebastian Zbik last summer for a BMX world title. This championship, one that has caused a fair amount of dry heaving from Sergio Martinez fans, is, in fact, no better or worse than any other of the world titles in circulation these days: it brings to mind the 50-billion dollar bank note printed in Zimbabwe a few years ago. From Problem Child: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.-Peter Manfredo Jr. Preview

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BAD COMPANY: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.-Marco Antonio Rubio Preview

Julio Cesar Chavez, Jr., AKA “The Thing That Should Not Be,” returns to San Antonio tonight, perhaps in a stretch limo, to face veteran powerpuncher Marco Antonio Rubio in a scheduled 12 at the Alamodome for the UNICEF middleweight championship of the world. Since his disastrous no-contest against Troy Rowland in 2009—as boring as an Andre Ward bout, perhaps—Chavez has delivered nothing but the goods in his last four starts, including shootouts against John Duddy and Sebastian Zbik. Despite his honest efforts in the ring, however, Chavez continues to suffer the barbs of fantasists all over the world who would rather see a P-4-P juggernaut trample 15-1 underdogs. From BAD COMPANY: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr.-Marco Antonio Rubio Preview

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You Got To Work To Get Your Pay: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr-Andy Lee Preview

For his part, Chavez, who showed some boxing ability against a weathered Peter Manfredo, Jr., should be looking to crowd Lee and bang to the body in close quarters as he did against Rubio. Like many fighters today, Lee is as helpless as a foal in the trenches. Grinding it out will also help neutralize the portside advantage Lee holds. In 2007 Chavez was farcically slapped around by the best southpaw he ever faced, talented but brittle Jose Celaya. A few months later, Ray Sanchez bounced shots off of his head with the regularity of a tennis ball machine. Clearly, lefties are not his best friends. Even so, unless Lee can drop the hammer on Chavez in the early-to-middle rounds, he runs the risk of fading down the stretch. From You Got To Work To Get Your Pay: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr-Andy Lee Preview.

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Topics: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr., SERGIO MARTINEZ

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