Straw Boss: David Haye TKO5 Dereck Chisora


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An absence of class precipitated the heavyweight tilt staged between David Haye and Dereck Chisora in Upton Park, London, yesterday; a stark difference in class settled it. Haye, with perhaps his most impressive display of speed and power as a heavyweight, dispatched of Chisora via fifth-round TKO.

Their infamous press conference row in February convinced the 30,000 or so in attendance that there was genuine animosity between these two belligerents, and that sanguinary expectations would be satisfied between the ropes. Indeed, even the suspension of Chisora by the British Boxing Board of Control couldn’t prevent this so-called “grudge match” from finding an audience. What this audience witnessed was a convincing display of Haye’s superiority.

With the opening bell, Haye, who in his last fight spent much of his time trying to win by disqualification, let fly with an arsenal perhaps not seen since his concussive reign at cruiserweight. The reticence that shamed his performance against Wladimir Klitschko last July was thankfully discarded (this aggression perhaps indicative not so much of Haye’s contempt for Chisora, but his disregard for “Del Boy’s” fistic repertoire.) Though Chisora outweighed Haye by 37 pounds, the smaller man set his feet long enough to deliver purposeful jabs, straight right hands and left hooks, mixing in body shots to expand the striking surface. That Haye managed to uncork 64 punches in the first round was an auspicious start for a fighter who’s developed the unbecoming habit of letting his mouth do all the talking.

The second round saw Chisora land a few malevolent rabbit punches. He paid a price for his crude attack, which is usually what happens when a fighter tries to close the distance without punching his way into range. Elusive without being evasive, Haye got off with his offense, moved and reset, then caught Chisora as the bigger man trudged forward. Speed of hand and foot were telling the story, as Haye scored while avoiding both the physicality and the cricket bowler right hands of Chisora.

This pattern continued into the third, with Haye adding a lead right-uppercut that caught Chisora when he charged in. Haye was becoming easier to find, easier to maneuver to the ropes, but while Chisora landed a few looping shots, they were mostly ineffective. Chisora’s best punch of the fight was a left hook at the bell that produced both a smile and shuffle-step from Haye.

The power of Haye came to bear for the first time early in the fourth round, as he landed a right hand that had Chisora backing into the corner, betraying his pain by feigning imperviousness. Haye continued his commitment to abuse throughout the round, landing clean, hurtful blows, while Chisora’s wack-a-mole aggression failed to win him a prize.

The end came late in the fifth. As Chisora pawed with a right hand, Haye bounced a counter left-right combination off his head, dropping him hard. Up on drunken legs at the count of eight, Chisora tried a mixture of holding and defensive punching to survive the round, but Haye found space to land a brutal four-punch combination to the head, punctuated by a left hook evil enough to stall Chisora’s fall to the canvas. To his credit, Chisora managed to beat the count, but referee Luis Pabon wisely waved off the contest. Haye had ramped up his offense, and Chisora had provided little evidence that a change in fortune was wrapped in his gloves. The time of the official stoppage was 2:57 of the fifth round. That Haye was awarded two peanut titles—despite this being his first fight out of retirement, and both him and Chisora coming off losses—is worth mentioning if only for comedic purposes.

In the aftermath of his victory, Haye, 26-2 (24), expressed an interest in fighting Vitali Klitschko, perhaps earning that opportunity the same way he did this one: on the weight of a weak division and some well-fabricated bad blood. What the future holds for Chisora 15-4 (9) is surely less glamorous, though he stands to figure in the division for some time. The shenanigans that produced this fight aside, all in attendance seemed to enjoy themselves, and the violent but one-sided affair helped inject life into the division much like a wooden post enlivens a scarecrow.

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Tags: David Haye Dereck Chisora Vitali Klitschko

  • Michael Nelson

    Hey JT,
     
    “Chisora’s wack-a-mole aggression failed to win him a prize.”  Perfect.  Haye’s speed and technique made Chisora’s roundhouses and “cricket bowler” right hands look silly, which I guess was to be expected.  Haye has talent, but as you said, he’s only a risk-taker against a certain level of opponent.  And it looks like he’s not interested in fighting anyone other than a Klitschko. 
     
    Good stuff.  I now know what to look for when I watch my first game of cricket.

  • jet79

     @Michael Nelson 
    Hi Mr. Nelson,
    Cricket is a great game! I had the opportunity to volunteer at a Southeast Asian Celebration this summer and got an introduction to the controlled chaos of cricket. Dude, you can hit the ball in any direction you want! It’s madness. Pitching (bowling) was by far the hardest part, what the run up, windmill release, and the rule against bending your elbow. Apparently, people who break this rule can suffer mob justice!
    Anyway, I’m wondering if the Vitali fight isn’t more Haye’s speed? Vitali is less cautious than his brother, and aging. Still, while the older brother might be the lesser of two evils, but he still probably beats Haye without much of a scare. What sucks is that Haye against the rest of the pack makes for some compelling fights.

  • jet79

     @Michael Nelson 
    Hi Mr. Nelson,
    Cricket is a great game! I had the opportunity to volunteer at a Southeast Asian Celebration this summer and got an introduction to the controlled chaos of cricket. Dude, you can hit the ball in any direction you want! It’s madness. Pitching (bowling) was by far the hardest part, what with the run up, windmill release, and the rule against bending your elbow. Apparently, people who break this rule can suffer mob justice!
    Anyway, I’m wondering if the Vitali fight isn’t more Haye’s speed? Vitali is less cautious than his brother, and aging. Still, while the older brother might be the lesser of two evils, he still probably beats Haye without much of a scare. What sucks is that Haye against the rest of the pack makes for some compelling fights.

  • thenonpareil

    Hi JT, 
    Nice work.  Where I grew up, in the Bronx, they used to play cricket in the middle of the street.   I used to watch from the window.  I have to say, it never made any sense to me.  
    Neither does the fact that now Haye is being talked up again–because boxing fans and boxing writers become moist easily–as some heavyweight threat after beating a fellow who cannot fight a lick.  This is something no one seems to mention: Chisora is horrible.   No jab, right hands thrown like a man trying to swat a fly, no left hook, no foot speed, no hand speed, no uppercuts, not much of a bodypuncher…..I mean, what are these people talking about and, more important, what are they watching?  He has a fair defense when he is not punching, good stamina, and is aggressive…OK. journeyman attributes.   He went the distance with Klitschko because Klitschko only had one arm that night, a fact conveniently forgotten.  If Haye backers can give Haye a pass for losing to W. Klitschko because of a broken pinky toe, then V. Klitschko ought to get the same for winning with one arm.  But, common sense and boxing are mortal enemies.  
    Haye did look good though and must have been laughing all night knowing that he made so much money fighting a third-rate pug.  
    Anyway, this was a fight  FOTY candidate, for sure.  
     
     
     

  • dennis wise

    Great write up.  Nice of Haye to actually perform up to his capabilities, even if Chisora isn’t any good.  I’d have interest in a fight with Vitali.  Of course, my standards are low. 

  • jet79

     @dennis wise
    Hi Dennis, thanks.
    I guess I’d watch the Vitali fight, but I’d rather see Haye in against dudes that won’t have him in subtle/not-so-subtle retreat two rounds in. Chisora isn’t any good. I wonder if all the smiles and “mutual respect” in the ring after weren’t really a self-satisfied celebration of two guys who just pulled off a swindle.

  • jet79

     @thenonpareil 
    Perhaps the best way to make a pass-time a national phenomenon is to make it utterly confusing?
    At the end of the third round (I think) Haye sat on his stool with a huge grin on his face. He knew he was in a mismatch, knew people bought into the press conference performance, knew he was going to get cut a ton of slack for the Klitschko embarrassment, on and on…He played it perfectly.
    Chisora is awful. Just trudges toward guys, arms in a knot, throwing punches like the heavyweight champion of the “Bumfights Vol. 8″ DVD. He’s durable, and Haye landed some absolutely vicious leather to get rid of him. But those punches were there all night. It’s hard to give a professional fighter with legit power praise for knocking out a fighter like Chisora (who’s proof that acting like a bully still intimidates.)
    It was fun, especially if you wanted to see at least one of these guys get dented. That’s good enough for FOTY consideration I bet.