Aftermath: Lamont Peterson-Victor Cayo, Yordanis Despaigne-Edison Miranda


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Lamont Peterson broke down and stopped a game Victor Cayo last night in the 12th round at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas. Cayo, 26-2, threw his fair share of punches, but struggled to navigate around Peterson’s guard, and was scourged during every elongated stay of in-fighting. Peterson, 29-1-1, isn’t the most consistent fighter in the world and a more resolute jab would help him fill the lulls that loom prominent within his performances. He demonstrates know-how on the inside though, using a variety of angles to rip hooks and uppercuts to the body, while avoiding most of the incoming.

While Cayo, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, made the bout competitive with his high punch output, Peterson seemed to control the proceedings whenever he wasn’t cruising or taking a break. The Memphis, Tennessee, resident isn’t a fluid combination puncher, natural counter puncher, or stiff jabber, so letting his foot off the pedal tends to bring his opponent back within reach of victory. The aforementioned inside-work, however, is a weapon he can flash extemporaneously against a fighter without the footwork to avoid phone booth combat. Cayo was at the mercy of damaging body shots whenever Peterson felt motivated to dole out punishment, and eventually he fell to a series of right hands during the waning seconds of the bout.

The fight was an IBF light welterweight title eliminator, so the 27-year-old Peterson is set up for a showdown against Amir Khan if Khan chooses not to encroach greener pastures. The suspicion here is that Khan’s feet would probably be too fast for Peterson, with the talented Brit fleeing, flurrying, and dancing his way to a unanimous decision. Peterson’s lulls would likely be his downfall in a bout that would resemble a more dramatic version of Khan’s scrap with Andriy Kotelnik.

But Peterson, when he’s aggressive, is a threat, and he would almost certainly put up more of a fight than milquetoast Zab Judah did last weekend. Peterson has established himself as an accomplished body puncher – if his work against Cayo wasn’t proof enough, check the middle rounds of his loss against Timothy Bradley – and Khan tends to leave his midsection open for attack. If drowsiness left from Judah’s languid effort is causing folks to yawn at the prospect of a Peterson fight, it should be noted that Khan still doesn’t like pressure. Peterson brings enough of it to make him weary.

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On the undercard, excessively officious referee Vic Drakulich showed that he makes for some impish what-if scenarios. For example, what if he was the third man in Bernard Hopkins’ foul infested bout with Keith Holmes a decade ago? Hopkins would have been disqualified from Don King’s middleweight tournament, and his road towards boxing lore would’ve been, at least temporarily, detoured. Miguel Cotto, Jose Luis Castillo, and other boundary-pushing talents would have also been DQ’d multiple times with Drakulich at the helm.

It goes to show you that it’s generally best to hold a little discretion while ruling on blows south of the border, and unfortunately for Colombian veteran Edison Miranda, Drakulich had none when he disqualified Miranda as his clash with Cuban light heavyweight Yordanis Despaigne started heating up.

To be fair, a more composed referee might have eventually DQ’d Miranda anyway, as Miranda, 34-6, did hit Despaigne low on multiple occasions through four and a half rounds. But Drakulich was duped by a Despaigne flop at the end of round two that would’ve made Robert Allen proud, and strangely, favored immediate point deductions over warnings.

While Despaigne, 9-1, controlled the bout with jabs and clubbing right hands through two stanzas, his punches lacked steam in rounds three and four, and he appeared to be tiring by the time Drakulich called an end to the fight. Miranda’s looping shots to the head mostly caught air, but the legal (and illegal) body blows he landed were effective.

A rematch would be fine for a Friday Night Fights main event in the future. As long as both the referee and Edison Miranda show some restraint.

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Tags: Edison Miranda LAMONT PETERSON Victor Cayo Yordanis Despaigne

  • thenonpareil

    Hi Michael,

    I’m with you about Peterson’s skill–decent fighter, nothing great, works the body well. But I’m easily impressed these days by fighters who don’t instantly cave in when things start going against them in the ring, and Peterson proved he had some grit against Bradley and Ortiz. He’ll need that if he fights Khan (which won’t happen, I think, because of alphabet madness and the fact that Khan wants bigger names). Cayo is the wasted motion syndrome type of fighter–lots of spazzing out but little accomplished.

    Despaigne doesn’t impress me at all–although I appreciate the action in his last two bouts–and Miranda is nothing but a woofer, now getting smacked around by guys with less than 10 fights. Drakulich must be insane thinking that fans pay hard-earned cash to see him be a nincompoop in the ring. Give Despaigne 5 minutes to recover and then see what’s what–point deduction, DQ, a short session in a whirligig, whatever. And, as you noted, there was no formal, hard warning from Drakulich at any time. I suspect his “Spanish” probably let him down here….I thought I did hear him say, in his broken Spanish, to Miranda, “How many puppies love you?”

  • thenonpareil

    @InfernoSilver

    Hi InfernoSilver,

    welcome to my nightmare. No worries about the confusion, that byline is pretty small. Anyway, I’m sure Michael will show up sooner or later re: your comment…I run a pretty laid back blog, so sometimes it takes a while to respond, etc., but usually somebody does.

    One thing I’ve noticed is that this new commentating system we have here seems to have a problem with ampersands…it took your comment for me to notice it, so thanks for bringing that to my attention.

    Despaigne put on a pretty good show with Ismayl Sillakh, but, yeah, he seems a little non-descript at this point. Miranda does not have the chin or ring I.Q. to be anything more than he is: a big punching lout with limited skills. You would think, with all that’s happened to him lately, he would be a little more focused, but he doesn’t have that professional temperment, and never really did, in my opinion. Drakulich, I believe, is involved in some kind of Secret Society where low blows are acknowledged or ignored according to the lunar phases.

    I think Peterson is a decent fighter, no great shakes, but I don’t see him having any edge on Khan except, perhaps, infighting. If he punched a little harder maybe a case could be made for him, but I don’t see him being able to outpoint Khan. It would be a legitimate fight, though, not something that can be said about Khan-Morales, if that actually happens. With Bradley out of the picture, Khan might wind up in the UK in the fall where he can draw a big crowd, get a PPV audience on GMT time, and get some HBO $$$ for the tape delay rights. Someone safe, since, as you note, with Mayweather-Ortiz set for September, Team Khan might not want to miscalculate.

    Anyway, I heard from a reliable source that Khan will be accompanied on his next ringwalk by Cradle Of Filth.

  • Michael Nelson

    @InfernoSilver

    Hey Inferno, no problem man, thanks for commenting. I agree that Miranda might have been disqualified anyways if he kept it up. Hopefully Drakulich took notes from Bayless in the main event though; Peterson’s body attack led to some low blows and a lot of borderline shots, and Bayless never did anything rash. Not to say that Peterson was as dirty as Pantera, but the discretion showed was night and day.

    I think you got Khan’s intentions down pretty well. Peterson probably isn’t high on the list of potential opponents for his last 140 bout, and if he has his way, he’ll have a welter intro while Floyd and Pacquiao pretend like they want to fight each other before his shot at Floyd late next year. They’ve mentioned Kell Brook as a target. Brook’s untested, but I think that’d be an interesting scrap.

    Also – and this is where you’re free to tell me if I’m full of shit – I think Khan has the style to give Floyd fits. Floyd may be too precise for him, but Khan’s comfortable with a patient counter puncher, and I’m not sure how comfortable Floyd is with pressing the issue.

  • Michael Nelson

    @InfernoSilver

    Hey Inferno, no problem man, thanks for commenting. I agree that Miranda might have been disqualified anyways if he kept it up. Hopefully Drakulich took notes from Bayless in the main event though; Peterson’s body attack led to some low blows and a lot of borderline shots, and Bayless never did anything rash. Not to say that Peterson was as dirty as Pantera, but the discretion shown was night and day.

    I think you got Khan’s intentions down pretty well. Peterson probably isn’t high on the list of potential opponents for his last 140 bout, and if he has his way, he’ll have a welter intro while Floyd and Pacquiao pretend like they want to fight each other before his shot at Floyd late next year. They’ve mentioned Kell Brook as a target. Brook’s untested, but I think that’d be an interesting scrap.

    Also – and this is where you’re free to tell me if I’m full of shit – I think Khan has the style to give Floyd fits. Floyd may be too precise for him, but Khan’s comfortable with a patient counter puncher, and I’m not sure how comfortable Floyd is with pressing the issue.

  • Michael Nelson

    @thenonpareil Hey Carlos,

    Peterson’s moxie is definitely admirable. I wish he had the motor to match, but of course, that’d make him closer to an elite fighter instead of just a solid one.

    Despaigne looked like he was on his way to outclassing Miranda before he started gassing a whole two rounds in. Admittedly, I thought the fight was going to suck, but it looked like it was turning into something before Drakulich and his poor attempts at Spanish intervened. Maybe he misinterpreted something, because he didn’t even bother with the pretense of fairness.

  • Michael Nelson

    @Andrew Fruman Hey Andrew,

    Neither of us are fans of the “rules are rules” argument. A good official in any sport knows how to interpret the rules and when to apply them. Drakulich is the type of character that would call every possible travel in a basketball game, which means yes, he’s going by the rule book, but he’s also making the game unbearably choppy. Nobody wants to remember the ref.

    Agreed on Peterson; I’m naturally a fan since he’s a body puncher. He just doesn’t have an exceptionally high motor, probably not high enough to outpoint Khan. He also prefers to keep a guard up instead of head movement, which would allow Khan to do the flurry-run-flurry dance he pulled against Kotelnik.